15 most beautiful places to see fall foliage on Long Island

Fall foliage on Long Island

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It’s that time of year again! The leaves are changing color and the air is getting crisp. 

In this blog post, I’ll share 15 highly rated, handpicked places to see fall foliage on Long Island. From Sunken Meadow State Park to Wildwood State Park, there are plenty of places to enjoy the changing leaves.

So get your camera out, grab your pumpkin spice latte and get ready to explore!

15 places you’ll fall in love with to see fall foliage on Long Island

From the North Shore to the South Shore there are plenty of sites to see the leaves change, making Long Island one of the greatest areas in New York to take in the fall season. These are 15 of the best: 

1. Sunken Meadow State Park

With over 1,200 acres of land, Sunken Meadow State Park is one of the largest parks on Long Island. The park is home to a variety of landscapes, including meadows, woods, and wetlands. There are also plenty of hikes and biking trails to explore. And of course, the views of the Long Island Sound are stunning.

2. Eisenhower Park

East Meadow’s Eisenhower Park in Nassau County is a 930-acre park. The park is home to a 18-hole golf course, a driving range, and a playground. There are also plenty of walking and biking trails. Eisenhower Park is especially beautiful in the fall, when the leaves change color.

3. Old Westbury Gardens

Old Westbury Gardens is a beautiful estate with gardens, ponds, and rolling hills. The grounds are perfect for picnics or walks. It’s a great place to spend your time anytime of year, but especially in fall. 

4. Bethpage State Park

Bethpage State Park is one of Long Island’s most popular parks. The park offers golf courses, hiking trails, biking trails, and more. In the fall, the leaves change color and the views are stunning.

5. Wildwood State Park

With 767 acres of land, Wildwood State Park is one of Long Island’s largest parks. The park offers hiking trails, nature walks, biking trails, and more. You can also see a variety of wildlife in the park, including deer and birds. And of course, the views of Long Island Sound are gorgeous . 

6. Planting Fields Arboretum

Planting Fields Arboretum is a historic public garden and arboretum in Oyster Bay. The arboretum is home to over 400 acres of gardens, woodlands, and meadows, as well as a variety of plant and tree species. Visitors can enjoy walking trails, picnicking, and garden tours.

7. Bayard Cutting Arboretum

Bayard Cutting Arboretum is a 691-acre public arboretum and garden in Great River. The arboretum features gardens, woodlands, ponds, and hiking trails. It’s a great place to enjoy the outdoors and take in the beauty of nature. 

8. Caumsett State Historic Park Preserve

Caumsett State Historic Park Preserve is a 1,520-acre state park in Lloyd Harbor. The park offers walking trails, bike paths, horseback riding trails, fishing areas, and more. Visitors can also see a variety of plant and wildlife species. The park sits between Oyster Bay and Huntington Bay, making it one of the best places to see fall foliage on Long Island with a water view. While you’re there, you can check out the Henry Lloyd Manor House as well.

9. Blydenburgh County Park

Blydenburgh County Park is a 627-acre park in Smithtown. The park offers hiking trails, horseback riding trails, biking trails, fishing areas, and more. You can also go swimming in the lake or canoeing down the creek. In the fall, the leaves change color and the views are beautiful. 

10. Cedar Creek Park

Cedar Creek Park is a 259-acre park in Seaford. The park offers hiking trails, biking trails, fishing areas, playgrounds, and more. You can also take a scenic walk along the boardwalk or go kayaking down the creek. In autumn ,the leaves of deciduous trees turn red , yellow ,and orange.

11. Connetquot River State Park Preserve

Connetquot River State Park Preserve is a 3,473-acre state park in Oakdale. The park offers hiking trails, horseback riding trails, fishing areas , and more. You can also take a scenic boat ride down the river or go kayaking. During the fall, the leaves of the trees change color, making it a beautiful place to visit.

12.Quogue Wildlife Refuge

Quogue Wildlife Refuge, a non-profit, is a 305-acre nature preserve in Quogue. There are hiking trails, bird watching areas, and more at the refuge. The refuge is also home to a wide variety of plant and wildlife species. In autumn, the colors of the foliage make it a great place to see.

13. Sands Point Preserve

Sands Point Preserve is a former Guggenheim estate with gardens, woodlands, cliff-side beach walks, and more .The preserve offers walking trails, picnicking areas and stunning views of the Long Island Sound. During the fall,the leaves of deciduous trees turn various shades of red, yellow and orange.

14. Caleb Smith State Park

Caleb Smith State Park is a 543-acre state park in Smithtown. The park offers hiking trails, horseback riding trails, picnic tables and more .You can also see a variety of plant and wildlife species in the park, including songbirds, butterflies, and deer.

15. West Hills County Park

West Hills County Park is a 800+ acre county park in the West Hills. The park offers hiking trails, horseback riding trails, biking paths and more. There are also picnic tables, playgrounds and a dog park. 

But wait, there are more

You can visit any of the parks, preserves, and refuges on this list to see amazing fall foliage on Long Island, but that’s not all.

Most main streets or villages like those in Huntington or Babylon are colorful ways to experience fall. Take a stroll down 25a, or venture to areas in Nassau and Suffolk county, not on this list such as:

  • Mashomack Preserve in Shelter Island 
  • Muttontown Preserve in Muttontown
  • Cedar Point County Park in East Hampton

If you take photos, tag @enjoylivingonli or use #livingonli on Instagram to share!

For more details on any of these sites or to plan your visit, go to the local town’s website for updated information.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does fall foliage mean?

Fall foliage refers to the changing colors of leaves in fall. The leaves of deciduous trees change color in the fall as a response to shorter days and cooler temperatures. The green pigment in the leaves, called chlorophyll, breaks down, revealing other colors that were hidden during the summer.

How long does fall foliage peak last?

The peak of fall foliage typically lasts for about two weeks, so make sure you get out there before the last leaves fall off.

Author

Cristina Morizio

Long Island real estate agent Cristina Morizo
As an experienced REALTOR® and Long Island native, I know the ins and outs of the real estate market. I help home buyers, sellers, investors and homeowners navigate and negotiate. Questions? Ready to buy or sell? Let’s talk!

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